Do Lecturer Has Responsibility to Motivate Their Students?

elon-musk-tesla-1024x768Motivating students to the extent they can is arguably a partial responsibility of undergraduate lecturer. Student motivation is an essential element that is necessary for quality education. How do we know when students are motivated? They pay attention, they begin working on tasks immediately, they ask questions and volunteer answers, and they appear to be happy and eager (Palmer, 2007). At the graduate level, I think it’s more a nice to have. There are three things to remember about education. The first one is motivation. The second one is motivation. The third one is motivation (Therrell H. Bell, 2011).

I think the lecture’s responsibility with regard to motivation is primarily the following. First, is to encourage and cultivate passion of the students (mostly by living it out & by pointing out heroes). Second, is to encourage and cultivate their curiosity. And third, is to help students make connections of relevance (help the students with a practical and perhaps emotional). Student attitude and behavior relevant to this matter has been the subject of some considerable investigation by those working in Higher and Further Education. Students’ learning experiences (Zhongqi, 2000). And they can also help student set their goals and to connect students with the campus resources. Motivation is optimized when students are exposed to a large number of these motivating experiences and variables on a regular basis. That is, students ideally should have many sources of motivation in their learning experience in each class (Palmer, 2007).

If a lecturer doesn’t motivate the students, it will be difficult for them to have an interest in the course that the lecturer teaches. The student could have too many works to do or could find the work too difficult. Accordingly, overload manifested itself in low self-esteem and work motivation (Cooper et al, 1982). A lot of being a lecturer is leadership, that is, to inspire other people to do things that they might not do otherwise. In addition, by leading and inspiring students, the subject materials become accessible to the students because they are willing to work a bit harder to understand them. Motivating is the work that managers or leader perform to inspire, encourage and impel people to take action (Louis Allen, 1986).

The students also have a part in motivation. It is important that the students take an interest in learning the materials required. Students need to provide feedback to the lecturer to let the lecturer knows what is best to be learn and not to be learn in the course. There is, for example, a distinct difference between the motivation of those who want to learn, and those who have to learn Race (1998). So motivation is two way communications (Campbell and Pritchard, 1976).

To conclude that, I think the term mentoring would be better than motivating. A good college lecturer mentors his or her students. Note that, I use the word lecturer who is more than a teacher. Students need to be motivated if they expect to success, and frankly, any college student especially a graduate student is already motivated. It is when these students become discouraged that a good mentor can help. But in my experience, only the student can sort this out. H.W. Beecher said, “God made man to go by motives, and he will not go without them any more than a boat without steam, or a balloon without gas. Find out what motivates man, touch that button to turn the key that makes men achieve.” (Helmlinger, 1997).

References

Effective Organizational Communication: a Key to Employee Motivation and Performance

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/d74f/ce848669ba68f7a8929a9ec1a108758a98b9.pdf

How to Sustain Students Motivation in a Learning Environment

http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED519165.pdf

Five key ingredients for improving student motivation

http://www.aabri.com/manuscripts/11834.pdf

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6 thoughts on “Do Lecturer Has Responsibility to Motivate Their Students?

  1. Hi, there!
    Your topic is interesting, especially with the additional information about your references in your writing. I have a suggestion to improve your writing in terms of stating your references. Instead of using too many citations in the paragraph, you could express them using combination of words. For example, the third sentence on the first paragraph. You could re-write it as the following sentence : According to Palmer (2007), students are motivated when they pay attention, they begin working on tasks immediately, they ask questions and volunteer answers, and they appear to be happy and eager.
    Thank you and good luck!

    Like

  2. Hello.
    I just would like to let you know if there is a mistyping on the fourth sentence in the fourth paragraph. You should also put the name of the author in the bracket, together with the year like this : (Race, 1998).
    Thank you

    Like

  3. Hi!
    I suggest you to replace the word ‘but’ with ‘however’ on the sixth sentence in the last paragraph of your writing, for example : However, in my experience, only the student can sort this out. I think it would sound better.
    Thank you

    Like

  4. I do agree that students motivation could grow through the support of both parties, the lecturer and the students themselves. As an educator, a lecturer has an obligation to assist the students in the learning process as well as motivating them. However, in reality, there were also found obstacles regarding students motivation, in which it is not merely fault of the lecturers, but strong willingness from the students themselves. It is an interesting topic anyways, thank you.

    Like

  5. Hi there, what an interesting topic!
    I have some suggestions to improve your writing in this article, especially on the second paragraph. To mention several points, you could use numbers as a sequence, such as first, second, and third. However, there is no need to put the word ‘and’ in the beginning of the new sentence. ‘And’ works as a conjunction and is supposed to be linking different phrases on the same sentence, not on the different sentence. It would be better if you use ‘the third objective is to help students in making connections…’ and ‘finally, the other goal is to help students to set their goals…’.
    Good luck!

    Like

  6. Do Lecturer Has Responsibility to Motivate Their Students?

    Motivating students to the extent they can is arguably a partial responsibility of undergraduate lecturer. Student motivation is an essential element that is necessary for quality education. How do we know when students are motivated? According to Palmer (2007), students are motivated when they pay attention, they begin working on tasks immediately, they ask questions and volunteer answers, and they appear to be happy and eager. At the graduate level, I think it’s more a nice to have. There are three things to remember about education. The first one is motivation. The second one is motivation. The third one is motivation (Therrell H. Bell, 2011).

    I think the lecture’s responsibility with regard to motivation is primarily the following. First, is to encourage and cultivate passion of the students (mostly by living it out & by pointing out heroes). Second, is to encourage and cultivate their curiosity. The third objective is to help students make connections of relevance (help the students with a practical and perhaps emotional). Student attitude and behavior relevant to this matter has been the subject of some considerable investigation by those working in Higher and Further Education. Students’ learning experiences (Zhongqi, 2000). And finally, the other goal is to help student set their goals and to connect students with the campus resources. Motivation is optimized when students are exposed to a large number of these motivating experiences and variables on a regular basis. That is, students ideally should have many sources of motivation in their learning experience in each class (Palmer, 2007).

    If a lecturer doesn’t motivate the students, it will be difficult for them to have an interest in the course that the lecturer teaches. The student could have too many works to do or could find the work too difficult. Accordingly, overload manifested itself in low self-esteem and work motivation (Cooper et al, 1982). A lot of being a lecturer is leadership, that is, to inspire other people to do things that they might not do otherwise. In addition, by leading and inspiring students, the subject materials become accessible to the students because they are willing to work a bit harder to understand them. Motivating is the work that managers or leader perform to inspire, encourage and impel people to take action (Louis Allen, 1986).

    The students also have a part in motivation. It is important that the students take an interest in learning the materials required. Students need to provide feedback to the lecturer to let the lecturer knows what is best to be learn and not to be learn in the course. There is, for example, a distinct difference between the motivation of those who want to learn, and those who have to learn (Race, 1998). So motivation is two way communications (Campbell and Pritchard, 1976).

    To conclude that, I think the term mentoring would be better than motivating. A good college lecturer mentors his or her students. Note that, I use the word lecturer who is more than a teacher. Students need to be motivated if they expect to success, and frankly, any college student especially a graduate student is already motivated. It is when these students become discouraged that a good mentor can help. However, in my experience, only the student can sort this out. H.W. Beecher said, “God made man to go by motives, and he will not go without them any more than a boat without steam, or a balloon without gas. Find out what motivates man, touch that button to turn the key that makes men achieve.” (Helmlinger, 1997).

    Like

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